Blog

A Framework to Reclaim a Tarnished Yet Worthy Term: Collaboration

How do you feel about the term collaboration? I know. I know. The ‘sigh and roll your eyes’ reaction is a pretty common one. And in fact I react that way myself more often than not. Over the past ten years, collaboration has been used left, right and center to describe just about anything and everything in the product development realm. And as a result, no one really knows what it means anymore. Ask ten people for a definition of collaboration and you’ll get twenty back.

An Introduction to Talent Management: A Means to Stem Chaos in Engineering?

So far on this blog, we’ve talked about a lot of issues when managing an engineering organization. We’ve looked at generational issues from several different Boomer, GenX and GenY perspectives. We’ve looked at the CEO’s directive to engineering and how engineering can’t operate as a black box anymore. A way to address a number of these issues lies in Talent Management initiatives.

Vuuch: A Unique Approach to Social Computing in Product Development

Overall, the objective behind Vuuch is the same as it has been for any other collaboration solution provided in the last ten years. If you resolve issues faster, then you can go through more iterations resulting in a better product or you can reach design release faster (or maybe just on time) to keep pace in the schedule. That being said, this solution goes about it in a markedly different way. Here’s what’s advantageous and concerning from my perspective.

Future Now: GenY Stepping into Boomer Engineering Roles

Back in September, in one of the very first posts on the generation gap in engineering, I wrote about how the age profile of an engineering organization resembles a saddle. There are lots of Boomer engineers, much fewer GenX engineers and quite a lot of GenY engineers. In that post, I included an excerpt from a discussion I had with Howard Schimmoller, who had this to say about the implications of such an age profile.

The Potential Advantages and Outstanding Concerns of PTC’s Creo

This series of posts will cover new product releases, changes in product strategy and acquisitions by engineering software providers affect engineering stakeholders. New posts in this series will be published based on software provider activities. Today’s post goes beyond the news around the launch of PTC’s Creo to analyze and assess the potential advantages, the …

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The Subtle Distinction Between Designing and Documenting Products

Last week, I wrote about a topic that generated a lot of discussion over on LinkedIn: Who builds 3D models? Engineers? Designers? Drafters? It’s been an ongoing debate for quite some time. Coming out of that discussion, at least in my mind, I’ve come to some clarity on the topic. But not necessary from a role specific view. In general, I believe there are two sets of activities in the design phase.

Howard Schimmoller Talks About Windchill at Lockheed Martin MS2 Divisions

I’ve always been extremely curious about PLM deployments in larger enterprises. Based on my experience, larger companies tend to take on PLM to support an internal initiative. And because internal initiatives often widely vary from company to company, the ultimate form that PLM takes within those companies can be completely different from one another.

Who Builds 3D Models? Engineers? Designers? Drafters?

With that in mind, I started up a conversation over at the ASME professional group over at LinkedIn. Not to get a definitive answer, but at laest to test the waters two years after some direct modeling CAD technology had hit the market. Specifically, I asked “Who should ultimately be the user of CAD tools? Engineer? Designer? Drafter?” Naturally, the question got some strong and opinionated responses.

Design Engineer Aaron Solet on Transitioning to Synchronous Technology in Solid Edge

A couple weeks ago, you watched Dr. Andrew Thomas talk about Energist’s transition to using Synchronous Technology in Solid Edge. As you’ll see below in my interview with Aaron Solet, there are both positives and negatives to learning how to use this new technology.